Gender and middle leadership: A personal reflection

‘How you are seen may affect how you are heard.’ This was one of many lines in Prof. Jennifer Eberhardt’s book ‘Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do’ that resonated with me.  In this context Eberhardt was talking about the gender bias in the historic hiring of female classicalContinue reading “Gender and middle leadership: A personal reflection”

Conflict in international schools: How can we move past it?

International schools pose a variety of interesting challenges that can lead to potential conflict.  Executive boards often reflect diverse thoughts on business and education. In many countries, key positions in the school and on the board will be made up of stakeholders from both within and outside of that particular country. Whilst this range ofContinue reading “Conflict in international schools: How can we move past it?”

Wellbeing in international schools: Are we missing the bigger picture?

Having been interested in the subject of wellbeing for the past year, and spending much time researching this area through reading, listening to podcasts and attending webinars, I often can’t shake the feeling that many of these discussions, whilst helpful, neglect some of the biggest challenges to student wellbeing within the international school context; safeguarding,Continue reading “Wellbeing in international schools: Are we missing the bigger picture?”

Managing exam time stress: How to help students harness their inner ‘Chatter’

This week I had the chance to read Ethan Kross’ book Chatter: The voice in our head, why it matters, and how to harness it, and it struck quite a few chords with me. The premise of the book is to examine the silent conversations that people have with themselves, and consider how to channelContinue reading “Managing exam time stress: How to help students harness their inner ‘Chatter’”

School Counselling and the importance of getting it right

The other day I was speaking to my wife about the role of counsellors in international schools. When I first started working in an international school, I remember it feeling quite strange to have a ‘counsellor’ working at a school. Particularly in a British school. I always felt like this was more of an ‘American’Continue reading “School Counselling and the importance of getting it right”

Issue 3 of the WISEducation Magazine is out NOW!

Hi everyone, I’m really excited to share the third issue of the WISEducation Magazine! WISEducation Magazine Issue 3 Issue 3 contains a range of articles from 13 different contributors based across the world including Thailand, Malaysia, Peru, UAE, USA and the UK. Inside you’ll find articles covering topics such as the importance of touch andContinue reading “Issue 3 of the WISEducation Magazine is out NOW!”

Supporting whilst unsupported: Navigating pastoral provision in international schools

Working in a pastoral role at an international school is an enlightening experience.  I distinctly remember interviewing a candidate for a pastoral position at our school who was UK-based and had never worked in an international context before.  When discussing how they might deal with a number of different safeguarding situations, they said they wouldContinue reading “Supporting whilst unsupported: Navigating pastoral provision in international schools”

Rethinking our thinking: The tale of the preacher, the prosecutor and the politician

In order to grow, ‘unlearning’ can be just as important, if not more so, than learning. That feels like a funny thing to say as someone who works in education. Schools are in the business of learning. It’s where we learn how to read, how to write, how to pass exams, how to make friends,Continue reading “Rethinking our thinking: The tale of the preacher, the prosecutor and the politician”

Boys don’t cry: A personal reflection on the gendering of pastoral care

Boys don’t cry. So the old adage goes. As a society we have thankfully come to recognise the flaw in this thinking, as generations of boys and men have paid the price, suffering from suppressed and hidden mental health issues, and higher rates of suicide. In fact, in the UK, suicide is the highest causeContinue reading “Boys don’t cry: A personal reflection on the gendering of pastoral care”